11.21.2008 | Düsseldorf | Schauspielhaus | 8:00 p.m.
Tickets
 

LOT. US

GUANGDONG MODERN DANCE COMPANY

LOT. US
MUI CHEUK-YIN / PRISCILLA LEUNG  Hongkong
Choreography: Mui Cheuk-Yin   
Gentle and poetic                       
European première   

A dancer and a singer perform poems about the lotus flower written by contemporary Chinese poet Leung Ping Kwan (Hong Kong). What emotions are triggered by this poem – by the content, sound and rhythm of the words? How can these be translated into movement and music? The performers in “Lot . us” (also a clever play on words) interpret these pieces beautifully. The poet praises the symbolic flower of traditional Chinese literature using contemporary language. In the same way, Mui Cheuk-yin (dance) unites the wide variety of traditional Chinese dances with modern types of western dance. Singer and performer Priscilla Leung also combines traditional techniques and modern improvisation in her songs.

Like India, China has grappled with the tension between its own spiritual and artistic traditions and the challenges posed by modern western culture for several years now. Dancer Mui Cheuk-yin is a perfect example of the artistic movement in which the Chinese tradition of dance adopts aspects of the present. Mui Cheuk-yin initially completed her training in traditional dance and opera in Hong Kong. She was a member and solo dancer in the “Hong Kong Dance Company” from 1981 to 1990. In 1985, Mui Cheuk-yin received a stipend to go to New York. This is where she learned the most important styles of modern dance, from Martha Graham to Merce Cunningham. She has toured successfully with her own choreographed pieces, and was also invited to the first “Fest mit Pina” (1998). In 2000, she was guest choreographer at Folkwang Tanzstudio in Essen. She also danced with Pina Bausch in Wuppertal during this time.

Priscilla Leung studied voice in the Music and Arts Department of Hong Kong Baptist University. She demonstrates the wide range of her ability in her unique vocal performances. She blends western music with vocal techniques used in Chinese opera. Her specialties include improvisation and singing without words, merely following the sound and modulation of the voice.

After many years of working with electronic music, Frédéric Blin started composing soundtracks for use in multimedia and theater productions in 1995. He works closely with choreographers, video artists and singer Priscilla Leung.



GUANGDONG MODERN DANCE COMPANY 
Guangdong, China

STICKS - Choreography: Sang Jijia.
Powerful and expressive
German première

The audience sees a large, white, rectangular table – perhaps a barrier, bed, resting place or grave. The performers dance around, on, next to or underneath it. Choreographer San Jijia shares his life-long passion for dance, his fantasies, the personal stories of his dancers or even the boredom of modern everyday live.
It’s pure modern dance – or, as William Forsythe put it: “Sang’s work is like clear, pristine water.“
Choreographer Sang Jijia returns to his childhood for inspiration in his work, when he started dancing at age 12. He recalls the Chinese tradition of using wooden stick figures to help students record their dance moves. These figures and their dances have made a lasting impression on him – they shape all of his dance theater performances.

Sang Jijia comes from a Tibetan family. He was born in Gansu and starting dancing at the age of 12. He was a member of the Guangdong Modern Dance Company from 1993 to 1998. In 2002, he came to Germany to study with William Forsythe. He continued to choreograph and dance for Forsythe until 2006. He has toured throughout Asia and Europe with his choreographed works.

With friendly support from: EU Culture Programme

www.gdmdc.com

Mui & Priscilla / Guangdong Modern Dance Company
   Foto: © Ringo Chan / Zhu Kai
Fest with Pina
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